Journal Article — The Living Dead In Colonial and Neo-Colonial Worlds: Fanon’s Mass Attack on the Ego in Cliff, Kincaid and Aidoo — by A.C. Warner

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Samira Kawash deals with the importance of the translation of the effects of a mass attack on the ego into psychological terms, in Fanon’s study of a patient who believed he was stalked by a vampire. I use these observations to examine apparitions in Michelle Cliff’s Free Enterprise, Jamaica Kincaid’s Autobiography of My Mother and Ama Ata Aidoo’s Our Sister Killjoy.

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Description

Abstract

Samira Kawash deals with the importance of the translation of the effects of a mass attack on the ego into psychological terms, in Fanon’s study of a patient who believed he was stalked by a vampire. I use these observations to examine apparitions in Michelle Cliff’s Free Enterprise, Jamaica Kincaid’s Autobiography of My Mother and Ama Ata Aidoo’s Our Sister Killjoy, and argue that appearances in these works of creatures that have meanings similar to that of zombis (in that they represent the practice of appropriating the bodies for the use of others) show a comparative mass attack on the ego in physical terms.

Recommended Citation

Warner, A.C. 2007. “The Living Dead In Colonial and Neo-Colonial Worlds: Fanon’s Mass Attack on the Ego in Cliff, Kincaid and Aidoo.” Pp. 239-250 in Reflections on Fanon: The Violences of Colonialism and Racism, Inner and Global—Conversations with Frantz Fanon on the Meaning of Human Emancipation (Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge: Volume V, Special Issue, 2007.) Belmont, MA: Okcir Press (an imprint of Ahead Publishing House).

The various editions of Reflections on Fanon: The Violences of Colonialism and Racism, Inner and Global—Conversations with Frantz Fanon on the Meaning of Human Emancipation can be ordered from the Okcir Store and are also available for ordering from all major online bookstores worldwide (such as Amazon, Barnes&Noble, and others).


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