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    Contesting Memory: Museumizations of Migration in Comparative Global Context

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    Contesting Memory: Museumizations of Migration in Comparative Global Context

    This Fall 2011 (IX, 4) issue of Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge, entitled “Contesting Memory: Museumizations of Migration in Comparative Global Context,” includes papers from the conference on “Museums and Migration” organized by the volume co-editors on June 25-26, 2010, at the Maison des Science de l’Homme (MSH) in Paris. The focus here is on questions of representation and social agency of both migrants and migration museum officials, adopting a comparative perspective on the complex and conflictive articulation between how migrants are represented by themselves and by museum institutions. Migrants are not passive but social agents actively involved in their communities and socially vigilant of the way they are treated, perceived and represented by the host society. They produce also their own representations that are often in conflict with Western hegemonic perceptions of their cultures and identities. Their strong presence in global cities and metropolitan societies today confronts the dominant society with issues of racial/ethnic discrimination and historical memory otherwise ignored by hegemonic Western views. Museums dealing with the history of slavery, migration and colonialism emerged as spaces of contestation, the term “migrant” itself being contested by long-established “minority” groups as one of the ways the dominant society still treats them as “foreigners” and “immigrants.”

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    Teaching Transformations 2011

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    Teaching Transformations 2011

    This Summer 2011 (IX, 3) issue of Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge entitled “Teaching Transformations 2011″—a fourth of its annual “Teaching Transformations” series—brings together selected proceedings of the joint CIT (Center for Innovative Teaching)/EdTech (Educational Technology) conference held on May 12, 2011, at UMass Boston. The editors’ note describes the reasons for the bringing together of the two separately organized conferences in the past. It also reports on the new name adopted by CIT (from its former name, the Center for the Improvement of Teaching). The papers include a variety of contributions on topics such as: innovative techniques to enrich the dynamics of classroom discussions; “addressing plagiarism in a digital age”; cross-cultural/national, cross-institutional teaching of a course using online educational tools; “‘Islamicizing’ a Euro/American curriculum”; modernizing classical language education using the communicative language teaching (CLT) technique in conjunction with new educational technologies; teaching about race, caste and gender in light of the findings of anthropological and genetic sciences; and suggestions for online student collaborations based on the experience of teaching a Critical Thinking course.

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    Learning Transformations: Applied Sociological Imaginations from First Year Seminars and Beyond

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    Learning Transformations: Applied Sociological Imaginations from First Year Seminars and Beyond

    This Spring 2011 (IX, 2) issue of Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge, entitled “Learning Transformations: Applied Sociological Imaginations from First Year Seminars and Beyond,” includes nine UMass Boston undergraduate student papers: seven from two sections of the first year seminar, Soc. 110G: “Insiders/Outsiders,” one from the course “Youth and Society” (Soc. 201), and another from the course “Elements of Sociological Theory” (Soc. 341), all taken during the 2010-2011 academic year at UMass Boston. The authors cultivate their sociological imaginations of the link between their personal troubles and broader public issues by exploring topics such as: difficulties with writing; struggles with overachievement; adolescent depression; pessimism; obsession with body self-image; pornography and love; drunken driving; feminine identity formation; and coping with personal traumas amid parental, sibling, and societal dysfunctions. The editor points to the significance of publishing undergraduate scholarships of learning and their sociological self-studies, highlighting the extent to which the origins of the present journal entitled “human architecture” can itself be traced to his own “student selves” and early undergraduate education in architecture at U.C. Berkeley, and specifically to a seminar he took with his undergraduate teacher and advisor, the late “professor of design” and renowned painter, Jesse Reichek.

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    Graduate Theorizations: Imaginative Applied Sociologies—Manifest and Latent

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    Graduate Theorizations: Imaginative Applied Sociologies—Manifest and Latent

    This Winter 2011 (IX, 1) issue of Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge, entitled “Graduate Theorizations: Imaginative Applied Sociologies—Manifest and Latent,” includes nine, theoretically engaging graduate student papers: six from a course in Applied Sociological Theory (Soc. 605) taken during the Fall 2010 semester at UMass Boston, a paper on the philosophy of the self and architecture from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and two master’s theses in psychology from Bangor University, UK. These papers from diverse ‘disciplinary’ origins or locations insightfully contribute, in both manifest and latent ways, to the application and enrichment of the Millsian sociological imagination. Comparative and integrative readings of these papers also reveal, in turn, the extent to which liberating sociological theorizing and practice amid critical applications of the sociological imagination require awakening to and moving beyond the dissociative disorder and hypnosis of rigid disciplinarity.

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