314 Indexknowledge is not truth but that someknowledge is “less false” than otherknowledge 103labor-process formation 112“laughs, turning away just enoughto help you see it is not you he islaughing at, but us” vi, 142leaving academia 127liberation from rigid approaches 47long-term, large-scale social change 28,29, 52, 54, 55, 63, 74, 98, 124, 125,135, 149, 150, 154, 162, 163, 166“makeshift trenches” 155, 164microdynamics of personal suffering andresistance 140misreading Hopkins to find a way out128moral duty 48more personally than politically orintellectually impactful 127multiple and overlapping selves, socialrelations, and social thought 103,105, 107, 159–160narrative mode of presentation 28, 54,84, 85no canons 40no detached observers 22, 54not shying away from taking sides 48“nub of the ‘question of method’”51–52“odd solidarity” vi, 143, 158, 161, 163on Braudel 49open future 55own doctoral dissertation 149, 161, 162pairing of the terms “partial” and“abstract” 102, 110“parenthetical genius who communicatesbrilliantly” 136passing xi, 145, 147, 150, 197pedagogical flexibility ii, 10, 30, 36pedagogy 35, 36, 166personality formation 112pleasure and play 55“political psychology of socialinstitutions” 136, 137potential futures 49problem with the notion of social“cases” 48, 54radical reorientation in thinking 45relational thinking 13, 16, 17, 20, 23,31, 46, 47, 48, 49, 54, 55, 84, 85, 102,108, 109, 166relational thinking: agencies shaped bytheir relations 16, 30, 108relational thinking: agencies shapingrelations ii, 4, 108, 149, 154, 158relational thinking: role and rolerelation 108relation of theory and practice 48research working groups 21, 22respecting students’ own choices 146seizing academic opportunities 11self-actualization 90self and society in world-systemsanalysis vi, 109, 110, 111, 153self-reflexivity in research 11, 151, 152,153significance of Hopkins for world-systems analysis 39, 35–40singular world-scale movement 112singular world-system 48, 166skeptical support vi, 83, 85small groups vi, 63, 128, 149, 161, 162,172specific dynamics of historical socialsystems 29state formation 112student of students ii, 56students’ freedom to take any courses38students inventing fields of study 38students teaching faculty 39, 135sympathetic skepticism 39“The Age of Transition” 54‘the problem of method’ 52the world as it is theoretically andhistorically constituted 48thinking a future ii, 56three aspects of the graduate program117transnational intellectual linkages 22uniqueness of the department 117, 158unit of analysis vi, 29, 54, 102, 107,108, 109, 110, 111, 153, 159, 160